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World Congress on Biosensors 2014

World Congress on Biosensors 2014
Biosensors 2014

Thursday, 30 June 2011

Oxford Instruments Launches New Deep Silicon Etch Technology

Oxford Instruments announces the launch of PlasmaPro® Estrelas100, new deep silicon etch technology developed to deliver industry leading process performance, and provides flexible solutions to the MEMS market. 
With the R&D market in mind, PlasmaPro® Estrelas100 offers the ultimate in process flexibility.  Nano and micro structures can be realised as the hardware has been designed with the ability to run Bosch™ and cryo etch technologies in the same chamber. From smooth sidewall processes to high etch rate processes, the PlasmaPro® Estrelas100 has been developed ensuring that the variety of MEMS applications can be achieved without the need to change the chamber hardware. 
As the development and commercialisation of new Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) is becoming a reality, traditional devices such as accelerometers, gyroscopes and microphones continue to see increased adoption in many consumer electronics, displays and automotive applications. MEMS can provide a solution where there is a requirement for a device or sensor to be miniaturised.  Devices emerging in the R&D phase include energy harvesting; speakers; RFID; pico projectors; oscillators; micro fuel cells; and autofocus technologies amongst others. 
“Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology continues to provide technologies that address existing and emerging applications in the MEMS market,” comments Mark Vosloo, Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology Sales Director, “With a broad process and application portfolio, our technologies enable many of the applications identified today and those of tomorrow. With over 19 years experience in MEMS R&D we understand the market, and address the needs of our customers to provide them with the most innovative tools available.”
Low cost of ownership through optimised hardware and processes control, coupled with outstanding global customer support, mean that Oxford Instruments continues to offer their customers an excellent product offering.
This latest system development reinforces Oxford Instruments’ aim to be the leading provider of new generation tools and systems for industrial and research markets, based on our ability to analyse and manipulate matter at the smallest scale. The company uses innovation to turn smart science into world-class products that support research and industry to address the great challenges of the 21st Century. 

Wednesday, 29 June 2011

Phase Monitor II for Compounds in Subcritical and Supercritical Fluids

The SFT Phase Monitor II is a powerful analytical tool for determining the solubility of various compounds and mixtures of compounds in subcritical and supercritical fluids. It provides direct, visual observation of materials under conditions which may be controlled precisely by the researcher. Experiments may be performed in liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide or in other compressed gases.  Additionally, the effect of co-solvents on the solubility of compounds of interest in supercritical carbon dioxide can be investigated with this instrument.  It allows the end user to view the dissolution, precipitation and crystallization of compounds over a wide range of pressures and temperatures.  Experiments can be done from a few hundred psi to 10,000 psi and from ambient temperature to 150º centigrade.

For more information, please call us at 302-738-3420 or visit us on-line at www.supercriticalfluids.com.

Impact Factor for Spectrochimica Acta B Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 3.549
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Sensros & Actuators A Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 1.933

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Vibrational Spectroscopy Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.083
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Chemometrics and Intelligent Laboratory Systems Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.222

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Journal of Analytical and Applied Pyrolysis Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.234

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for the Journal of Pharmaceutical and Biomedical Analysis Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.733

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Microchemical Journal Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.480
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Journal of Chromatography B Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 2.971

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Sensros & Actuators B Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 3.368
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Talanta Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 3.722
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Journal of Chromatography A Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 4.194
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Bisensors & Bioelectronics Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 5.361
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for Trends in Analytical Chemistry Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 6.602
Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Impact Factor for ACA Just Released

The 2010 impact factor is: 4.310

Thanks to all editors, reviewers and authors for all of their hard work.

Workshop October 13, 2011: Distributed Healthcare - Making Technology Work for Patient Benefit

The workshop will be held on October 13 in the Berzelius Lecture Hall at Campus US in Linköping, Sweden and will have the title 'Distributed Healthcare - Making Technology Work for Patient Benefit'. The workshop will be arranged as a satellite conference to the Swedish Med Tech Days in Linköping, which we hope will attract many participants.
The workshop will focus on the development of technologies for distributed healthcare, particularly with respect to the interfaces between equipment and caretakers/caregivers. The interaction between caretaker and caregiver in the homecare context will also be discussed. There will be five sessions:
1. Understanding the target group
2. Communicating information
3. Technical session I
4. Ethical dilemmas
5. Technical session II
The following speakers have been confirmed:
Donald Bruce, Edinethics Ltd, Edinburgh
Göran Collste, Linköping University
Ulf Dahlström, Linköping University
Daniel Filippini, Linköping University
Peter Håkansson, Ericsson Research, Stockholm
Stefan Holmlid, Linköping University
Peter Hult, Linköping University
Torbjörn Kronander, Sectra Imtec AB, Linköping
Sam Nordfeldt, Linköping University
Lars-Håkan Thorell, Emotra AB, Linköping
Johan Trygg, Umeå university
Faiez Zannad, CHU Nancy, Nancy
The full program will be available shortly and registration at nominal cost will be possible via www.liu.se/forskning/list/workshops?l=en

Tuesday, 28 June 2011

Just Published: Analytica Chimica Acta

A new issue of this journal has just been published. To see abstracts of the papers it contains (with links through to the full papers) click here:
Selected papers from the latest issue:

Microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS): A tutorial

23 June 2011, 21:41:42Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Analytica Chimica Acta, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 23 June 2011
Mohamed, Abdel-Rehim
This tutorial provides an overview on a new technique for sample preparation, microextraction by packed syringe (MEPS). Not only the automation process by MEPS is the advantage but also the much smaller volumes of the samples, solvents and dead volumes in the system. Other significant advantages such as the speed and the simplicity of the sample preparation process are provided.In this tutorial the main concepts of MEPS will be elucidated. Different practical aspects in MEPS are addressed. The factors affecting MEPS performance will be discussed. The application of MEPS in clinical and pre-clinical studies for quantification of drugs and metabolites...

Review ofAnalytical Methods for the Quantification of Iodine in Complex Matrices

23 June 2011, 21:41:42Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Analytica Chimica Acta, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 23 June 2011
C. Phillip, Shelor , Purnendu K., Dasgupta
Iodine is an essential element of human nutrition. Nearly a third of the global population has insufficient iodine intake and is at risk of developing Iodine Deficiency Disorders. Most countries have iodine supplementation and monitoring programs. Urinary iodide(UI)is the biomarker used for epidemiological studies; only a few methods are currently used routinely for analysis. These methods either require expensive instrumentation with qualified personnel(Inductively coupled plasma-Mass Spectrometry, Instrumental Nuclear Activation Analysis) or oxidative sample digestion to remove potential interferences priorto analysis by a kinetic colorimetric method originally introducedby Sandell and Kolthoff ∼75 years ago. The Sandell-Kolthoff (S-K) method is based on...

A novel silver-coated solid-phase microextraction metal fiber based on electroless plating technique

23 June 2011, 21:41:42Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Analytica Chimica Acta, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 23 June 2011
Juanjuan, Feng , Min, Sun , Jubai, Li , Xia, Liu , Shengxiang, Jiang
A novel silver-coated solid-phase microextraction fiber was prepared based on electroless plating technique. Good extraction performance of the fiber for model compounds including phthalate esters (dibutyl phthalate, dioctyl phthalate, dicyclohexyl phthalate and diallyl phthalate) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene) in aqueous solution was obtained. Under the optimized conditions (extraction temperature, extraction time, ionic strength and desorption temperature), the proposed SPME-GC method showed wide linear ranges with correlation coefficients (R2) ranging from 0.9745 to 0.9984. The limits of detection were at the range of 0.02 to 0.1μgL−1. Single fiber repeatability and fiber-to-fiber reproducibility as well as stability to...

Just Published: Sensors & Actuators A: Physical

A new issue of this journal has just been published. To see abstracts of the papers it contains (with links through to the full papers) click here:
Selected papers from the latest issue:

A Wind-Flutter Energy Converter for Powering Wireless Sensors

25 June 2011, 20:34:09Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 25 June 2011
Fei, Fei , John D., Mai , Wen Jung, Li
This paper describes a low-speed wind energy harvesting system that transfers aerodynamically-induced flutter energy into electrical energy. A random airflow generates mechanical vibrations due to the fluid-structure interaction between a flexible belt and the airflow. An electromagnetic resonator with copper coils and a permanent magnet is designed to efficiently harvest electrical energy from the induced mechanical vibrations. Different groups of springs are compared at various wind conditions to maximize the power output. Typically ∼7 mW of electrical energy can be obtained at ∼3m/s wind speed with a 1 meter long belt. A power conditioning circuit with a charge pump and...

Bonding of carbon nanotubes onto microelectrodes by localized induction heating

25 June 2011, 20:34:09Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Sensors and Actuators A: Physical, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 25 June 2011
Mingxiang, Chen , Xiaohui, Song , Qiang, Lv , Zhiyin, Gan , Sheng, Liu
Bonding of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto metallic electrodes is achieved by localized induction heating. The contact bonding is formed by inductive heating the electrodes with radio frequency magnetic field. The contact resistance can be reduced by approximate 90% and the reduction is irreversible. It is demonstrated that the induction heating will selectively occurs on the structures with high electronic conductivity and relative permeability, which can be utilized to realize large scale non-contact localized heating. In addition, the atomistic study indicates that the surface charges induced by induction eddy current can improve the wetting properties between the metal atoms and CNT...

Out-of-Box Solution for Managing Lab Information

Micronic has announced a new version 4.6 of its popular Track-IT™ information management system.  Track-IT is a unique out-of-the-box LIMS/LIS solution made for scientists enabling you to reorganize and track your tubes and samples in just minutes.

Fully compatible with most commercial barcode readers, scanners and Tubesorter systems - Track-IT allows you to catalogue and organise samples quickly and efficiently. The central information database produced by Track-IT is customisable to match the workflow of your laboratory, as well as to match the unique aspects of different sample types. Track-IT has been designed to empower laboratory scientists to simply manage sample data and information and make it available to other colleagues in their organisation.

Built around independent modules that can interact with each other, Track-IT 4.6 will manage a wide variety of day-to-day useful lab information. The main concept behind Track-IT is that each scientist in the lab can manage quickly data and information and make it available to the rest of the lab community. Due to Intranet support, data can be accessed from any connected computer in the lab, which accelerates information retrieval. Consequently laboratory staff spends less time on recurrent and time-consuming operations and dedicate more precious time to research activity.

Track-IT allows you to simply import data from existing files into a common presentation, undertake cross database searches, quickly retrieve information and produce reports.  Compliant with CFR 21 Part 11 protocols, Track-IT offers full sample audit traceability.  Combining reliability, efficiency and ease of use with affordability a single Track-IT licence covers all users within an organisation.

To access an online demonstration of Track IT or sign up to a free 30-day trial please visit http://www.micronic.com/products/74/sample-management-database or contact Micronic Europe BV now on +31-320-277070 / sales@micronic.com.

Microplate Sealing Reference Guide

Available from Agilent Automation Solutions - the 'Reference guide to optimal microplate sealing' was written for laboratories looking to optimise microplate sealing processes to safeguard the integrity of their samples. Achieving an optimal microplate seal depends on many factors including microplate design, construction material, batch-to-batch plate production consistency, microplate features, sealing parameters and the type of seal used.

The informative 16-page guide includes a microplate sealing tips section, information on how to optimise sealing parameters when thermal sealing, a comprehensive FAQ section and an electronic PDF form designed to facilitate the capture of key information helpful when requesting technical/applications support.

The free-of-charge reference guide will be of interest to both those currently sealing microplates or those thinking about investing in a microplate sealing instrument.

A copy of `Reference guide for optimal thermal microplate sealing' is available by contacting your local Agilent sales office or downloading the document from http://www.chem.agilent.com/Library/datasheets/Public/5990-3483EN_LO.pdf.

Monday, 27 June 2011

Just Published: Sensors & Actuators B: Chemical

Selected papers from the latest issue:

Metal (Pd, Pt)-Decorated Carbon Nanotubes for CO and NO Sensing

25 June 2011, 23:06:52Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 25 June 2011
Kunjie, Li , Wenchuan, Wang , Dapeng, Cao
Using the first-principles calculations, we investigated adsorption of CO and NO gas molecules on the Pd- and Pt-decorated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). The metal-decorated SWNTs exhibit strong affinity toward the gas molecules. Our results reveal that the CO and NO gas molecules can be chemisorbed on the Pd or Pt atom, accompanying with the large binding energy and significant charge transfer. Adsorption of these gases would affect the electronic conductance of the materials, which can serve as a signal of gas sensor. In particular, adsorption of NO generates the magnetic properties to the metal-decorated SWNT, which can also serve as...

Highly sensitive label-free immunosensor for ochratoxin A based on functionalized magnetic nanoparticles and EIS/SPR detection

25 June 2011, 23:06:52Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Sensors and Actuators B: Chemical, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 25 June 2011
Lucian-Gabriel, Zamfir , Irina, Geana , Sondes, Bourigua , Lucian, Rotariu , Camelia, Bala , ...
A label-free immunosensor for the detection of ochratoxin A (OTA) based on use of magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) was developed. A gold electrode was modified using bovine serum albumin conjugate with a glutaraldehyde-thiolamine linker, creating a layer that prevents non-specific binding of OTA on gold. The OTA antibodies were attached to MNPs using the carbodiimide chemistry and afterwards were immobilized on the modified gold electrode using a strong magnetic field. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) were used to characterize each step in immunosensor development. The impedance variation due to the specific antibody-OTA interaction was...

Just Published: Journal of Chromatography A

A new issue of this journal has just been published. To see abstracts of the papers it contains (with links through to the full papers) click here:
Selected papers from the latest issue:

Direct Aqueous Determination of Glyphosate and Related Compounds by Liquid Chromatography/Tandem Mass Spectrometry using Reversed-Phase and Weak Anion-Exchange Mixed-mode Column

26 June 2011, 20:29:50Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography A, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 26 June 2011
Chunyan, Hao , David, Morse , Franca, Morra , Xiaoming, Zhao , Paul, Yang , ...
Analysis of the broad-spectrum herbicide glyphosate and its related compounds is quite challenging. Tedious and time-consuming derivatization is often required for these substances due to their high polarity, high water solubility, low volatility and molecular structure which lacks either a chromophore or fluorophore. A novel liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS-MS) method has been developed for the determination of glyphosate, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and glufosinate using a reversed-phase and weak anion-exchange mixed-mode Acclaim® WAX-1 column. Aqueous environmental samples are directly injected and analyzed in 12minutes with no sample concentration or derivatization steps. Two multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) channels are monitored in...

Analysis of primary aromatic amines in the mainstream waterpipe smoke using liquid chromatography—electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry

26 June 2011, 20:29:50Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography A, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 26 June 2011
Jens, Schubert , Oliver, Kappenstein , Andreas, Luch , Thomas G., Schulz
In recent years waterpipe smoking has spread worldwide and emerged as global health issue. Yet only little is known on the composition of waterpipe smoke. Here, we present a study on the identification and quantification of primary aromatic amines (PAAs) in this complex environmental matrix. Smoking of the waterpipe was conducted with a smoking machine and particulate matter was collected on glass fiber pads. We developed a fast, simple and specific liquid chromatography—electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) approach to simultaneously detect 31 different PAAs in this matrix. The detection limits comprised a range of 0.45ng to 4.50ng per smoking...

Selective extraction of alkaloids in human urine by on-line single drop microextraction coupled with sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography

26 June 2011, 20:29:50Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography A, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 26 June 2011
Wenhua, Gao , Gaopan, Chen , Yaowen, Chen , Nana, Li , Tufeng, Chen , ...
A novel method of on-line single drop microextraction (SDME) coupled with sweeping micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) for the selective extraction and dual preconcentration of alkaloids was developed. In this technique, analytes of three alkaloids were firstly extracted from 4.0mL basic aqueous sample solution (donor phase, 500mM NaOH) into a layer of n-octanol at temperature 30 ∘C with the stirring rate of 1150rpm, then back-extracted into the acidified aqueous acceptor (acceptor phase, 50mM H3PO4) suspended at the tip of a capillary at 650rpm. After then, the aqueous acceptor was introduced into capillary by hydrodynamic injection with a height difference of 15cm...

Acrylate ester-based monolithic columns for capillary electrochromatography separation of triacylglycerols in vegetable oils

26 June 2011, 20:29:50Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography A, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 26 June 2011
M.J., Lerma-García , M., Vergara-Barberán , J.M., Herrero-Martínez , E.F., Simó-Alfonso
A simple and reliable method for the evaluation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in vegetable oils by capillary electrochromatography (CEC) with UV-Vis detection, using octadecyl acrylate (ODA) ester-based monolithic columns, has been developed. The percentages of the porogenic solvents in the polymerization mixture, and the mobile phase composition, were optimized. The optimum monolith was obtained at the following ratios: 40:60% (wt/wt) monomers/porogens, 60:40% (wt/wt) ODA/1,3-butanediol diacrylate and 23:77% (wt/wt) 1,4-butanediol/1-propanol (14 wt% 1,4-butanediol in the polymerization mixture). A satisfactory resolution between TAGs was achieved in less than 12min with a 65:35 (v/v) acetonitrile/2-propanol mixture containing 5mM ammonium acetate. The method was applied...

Reproducible and Quantifiable Directed In Vivo Angiogenesis Assessment Assays

AMSBIO has announced a new range of Directed in vivo Angiogenesis Assay (DIVAA™) kits that address the short-comings of the traditional plug assay by controlling the site for angiogenesis, increasing reproducibility, conserving test compounds, and supplying more statistical data for quantitative analysis. This range of kits is designed to test for activation, inhibition and tube formation.

The Directed In Vivo Angiogenesis Assay (DIVAA™) is the first in vivo system for the study of angiogenesis that provides quantitative and reproducible results. The DIVAA kits provide implant grade silicone cylinders closed at one end, called angioreactors. The angioreactors are filled with 20 microlitres of AMSBIO's Basement Membrane Extract (BME) premixed with or without angiogenesis modulating factors. These angioreactors are then implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal flanks of nude mice. With the onset of angiogenesis, cellular vascularization proceeds to invade the angioreactor, and as early as nine days post-implantation, there are enough cells to determine an effective dose response to angiogenic modulating factors. The sleek design of the patented angioreactor optimizes sensitivity and allows for up to four units per mouse, giving a more controlled experiment and decreasing the number of mice required for a study.

Tumour cells can be implanted into the angioreactor, to study their angiogenic effects in an in vivo system. AMSBIO's DIVAA Kit is provided with FITC-Lectin for fluorescent quantitative analysis. Optional protocols are available for analysis with Calcein-AM and Dextran-FITC.

For further information please visit www.amsbio.com/in-vivo-Angiogenesis-Assay-kits-DIVAA.aspx or contact AMSBIO on +44-1235-828200 / +1-949-768-8365 or email info@amsbio.com

Optibrium Announces Free Models to Predict Toxicity of Compounds

Optibrium™, a provider of software solutions for drug discovery, announces the availability of a range of models to help predict the toxicity of potential new compounds. Optibrium has generated a range of Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (QSAR) models of key toxicity endpoints, based on data made available by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as part of its Toxicity Evaluation Software Toolkit (T.E.S.T.). The toxicity prediction models were built with the Auto-Modeller™ module of the newly launched StarDrop™ 5 and are available to all StarDrop users free-of-charge. To find out more and download the models please visit Optibrium’s on-line community at http://www.optibrium.com/community.

Whether compounds are intended as drugs, cosmetics, agrochemicals or for other industrial applications, it is essential to understand their potential to cause toxic effects. Understanding this can allow scientists to prioritise chemical structures for further research or identify the most appropriate downstream experiments to confirm their safety. However, the ability to predict toxicities in compounds can be extremely challenging. Models have a high degree of uncertainty in the predictions they make due to the complexity and variety of chemical and biological mechanisms that lead to toxicities.

StarDrop, from Optibrium, is an interactive platform that guides scientists to make decisions on the design and selection of high quality compounds with the aim of achieving an optimal balance of properties.  StarDrop provides an ideal environment for application of toxicity models to the selection of compounds. Its probabilistic scoring algorithm allows predictive models of toxicity to be used, while explicitly taking into consideration the uncertainty in each prediction.  This ensures that uncertain predictions are not given undue weight, relative to other data, when prioritising compounds that are more likely to have an appropriate balance of properties. As a result, compounds which are more likely to be toxic are efficiently identified, improving lead optimisation. The unique Glowing Molecule™ feature within StarDrop offers an innovative visualisation that highlights regions of a compound with a significant influence on a predicted property. As a result, this provides a link between the predicted toxicity and the chemical mechanism and guides users in the redesign of compounds with improved safety.

“These predictive toxicity models complement the range of properties that can already be predicted with StarDrop’s ADME QSAR module. As they’re based on public-domain data sets, we’re pleased to offer them free-of-charge to all of our users.” comments Dr. Matthew Segall, CEO of Optibrium. “Many of the toxicity prediction models developed with the use of StarDrop are particularly relevant to potential environmental pollutants. This illustrates the usability of StarDrop not just for drug discovery applications, but for industrial, agrochemical or cosmetic applications.”

The toxicity prediction models conform to the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) principles for validation of QSAR models for regulatory purposes and have also been found to perform equivalently or better than the EPA T.E.S.T. models on the same validation sets. All models were built automatically with StarDrop’s Auto-modeller module, illustrating that the Auto-Modeller is capable of building models that compare favourably with those created with more ‘manual’ methods. For further information please visit Optibrium’s on-line community at http://www.optibrium.com/community.

Friday, 24 June 2011

Just Published: Biosensors & Bioelectronics

A new issue of this journal has just been published. To see abstracts of the papers it contains (with links through to the full papers) click here:
Selected papers from the latest issue:

Femtomolar DNA detection by parallel colorimetric darkfield microscopy of functionalized gold nanoparticles

23 June 2011, 22:23:56Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 23 June 2011
Remco, Verdoold , Ron, Gill , Felicia, Ungureanu , Robert, Molenaar , Rob P.H., Kooyman
We introduce a sensing platform for specific detection of DNA based on the formation of gold nanoparticles dimers on a surface. The specific coupling of a second gold nanoparticle to a surface bound nanoparticle by DNA hybridization results in a red shift of the nanoparticle plasmon peak. This shift can be detected as a color change in the darkfield image of the gold nanoparticles. Parallel detection of hundreds of gold nanoparticles with a calibrated true color camera enabled us to detect specific binding of target DNA. This enables a limit of detection below 1.0×10−14M without the need for a spectrometer...

Controlled immobilization of acetylcholinesterase on improved hydrophobic gold nanoparticle/prussian blue modified surface for ultra-trace organophosphate pesticide detection

23 June 2011, 22:23:56Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Biosensors and Bioelectronics, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 23 June 2011
Shuo, Wu , Xiaoqin, Lan , Wei, Zhao , Yupeng, Li , Lihui, Zhang , ...
An ultrasensitive amperometric acetylcholinesterase (AChE) biosensor was fabricated by controlled immobilization of AChE on gold nanoparticles/poly(dimethyldiallylammonium chloride) protected Prussian blue (Au-PDDA-PB) nanocomposite modified electrode surface for the detection of organophorous pesticide. The Au-PDDA-PB membrane served as an excellent matrix for the immobilization of enzyme, which not only enhanced electron transfer but also possessed a relatively large surface area. In addition, the surface hydrophilicity of the Au-PDDA-PB nanocomposite was finely controlled in the static water contact angle range of 25.6 to 78.1° by adjusting the ratio of gold nanoparticles to PDDA-PB. On an optimized hydrophobic surface, the AChE adopts an orientation...

Fast Dynamic Array™ IFC for Ag-Bio & Genotyping Studies

Fluidigm Corporation has introduced its 192.24 Dynamic Array™ IFC, designed to genotype 192 samples against 24 SNP assays in a single run, providing 4,608 data points in just one hour. The 192.24 integrated fluidic circuit (IFC) has immediate applicability in agricultural biotechnology and genome wide association studies.

Fluidigm's latest integrated fluidic circuit features an innovative design that greatly increases sample throughput for common SNP genotyping applications. Using the new Fluidigm IFC Controller RX, the new Dynamic Array IFC enables sample loading within 30 minutes, and thermal cycling in another 30 minutes, resulting in a greatly accelerated workflow. The power to deliver 4,608 data points in one hour makes the Fluidigm system the fastest commercially practical genotyping solution in the industry today. The 192.24 Dynamic Array chip addresses the high throughput needs of genotyping by providing a four-fold increase in sample throughput when compared to the 48.48 Dynamic Array IFC.

This accelerated workflow and increased throughput enables more data points, while the 192.24 chip retains Fluidigm's 99.75 percent or greater call accuracy and 99 percent or greater call rates. The new chip can be read using either the BioMark™ HD or EP1™ Systems.

"The Fluidigm 192.24 Dynamic Array chip enables life science researchers to achieve ultra-low cost, and rapid throughput while maintaining full assay and reagent flexibility. Providing the ability to use fewer SNP assays, and run a high number of samples is a format that is ideal for some applications in Ag-Bio and for GWAS follow-up studies," said Gajus Worthington, Fluidigm president and chief executive officer.

The 192.24 is particularly suited to take advantage of Fluidigm's new SNPtype™ Assays for genotyping. While the 192.24 Dynamic Array chip will support all industry-standard assays, SNPtype Assays offer a low-cost SNP genotyping solution, are made on-demand, and are ready to meet high-throughput needs for a wide range of agricultural applications and confirmation of next-generation sequencing results.

Fluidigm IFCs, including the 192.24 chip, use just microliters of materials, allowing scientists to achieve comprehensive genetic profiling from miniscule amounts of sample. Each reaction chamber in the 192.24 chip requires only eight nanoliters of material. In addition, all Fluidigm Dynamic Array IFCs feature a matrix-style architecture that automatically assembles every possible reaction between the samples and the assays providing up to 99 percent fewer pipetting steps than needed when using 384-well plates.

Fluidigm (NASDAQ:FLDM) develops, manufactures and markets microfluidic systems for growth markets in the life science and agricultural biotechnology, or Ag-Bio, industries. Fluidigm's proprietary microfluidic systems consist of instruments and consumables, including integrated fluidic circuits, or chips, and reagents. These systems are designed to significantly simplify experimental workflow, increase throughput and reduce costs, while providing the excellent data quality demanded by customers. Fluidigm actively markets three microfluidic systems including nine different commercial chips to leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, academic institutions and Ag-Bio companies.

For more information, please visit
www.fluidigm.com.

SAGE-N RESEARCH SORCERER PLATFORM IMPLEMENTED BY THE

Sage-N Research, Inc., the world leader in supplying Integrated Data Appliances (IDAs) for proteomics research, announced that the State University of New York at Buffalo’s pharmaceutical sciences research group has chosen the Sage-N Research SORCERERTM platform to assist with its advanced proteomics research.

One of the primary reasons for this was to take advantage of the sophisticated algorithms and server capabilities that the SORCERER offers, as an overall life science platform. The SORCERER will replace the current super-computers that are used within the University’s laboratory to characterize and identify proteins and handle the large amounts of data generated from high throughput mass spectrometers.

The Lab of Clinical Proteomics and Pharmaceutical Analysis, led by Dr. Jun Qu, Assistant Professor at The State University of New York at Buffalo and the Chief Scientist in Bioanalysis in CEBLS, has decided to go with Sage-N Research’s SEQUEST® 3G search engine and Matrix Science’s Mascot®, both hosted on the SORCERER platform, to study a variety of applications including diagnostics and biomarker discovery for cardiovascular diseases, colon, pancreatic and prostate cancer, cocaine addiction, retina degeneration, COPD and HIV.

The SORCERER from Sage-N Research is a “plug and play” appliance for life sciences designed to support multiple software programs and is well suited to researchers in high-throughput laboratories, core facilities and corporate environments. It provides a unique combination of optimized hardware and can be easily customized with different post-processing tools to suit an individual customer’s needs. The platform also offers high-level server-based solutions for storage, back-up and rapid processing of the complex data-sets generated by high end mass spectrometers.

The University at Buffalo selected SORCERER to be used with both Mascot and SEQUEST 3G, to optimize the search conditions. This solution has replaced the super-computer in the University at Buffalo’s laboratory, as it offers the capability to handle the vast amounts (up to a terabyte) of information generated by a unique long-gradient nano-Lliquid Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (nano-LC/MS) developed in Qu’s lab.

“It has been great to be able to finally deploy both Mascot and SEQUEST 3G on the Sage-N Research SORCERER platform and experience the benefits of two very powerful search engines for important protein ID applications,” commented Dr. Jun Qu. “Most members of the industry are still using standalone PC servers which can be time consuming to configure and would consume more power to process the same amount of data. For example, 60k-80k spectra were generated by a single nano-LC/MS run of a clinical sample; in our lab, one typical clinical project will involve the analysis of 2-3 millions of spectra, which is a heavy burden even for a super computer.  We have found the SORCERER platform to be very reliable, easy-to-use and the next generation of Information Technology for life sciences.” In addition, John Cottrell, Director at Matrix Science comments “We are excited that the University at Buffalo has chosen to harness the power of Mascot on the SORCERER platform for its advanced proteomics research. This solution allows users to handle large amounts of data easily and efficiently, accelerating their vital research programs.”

For more information about Sage-N Research, Inc. and its easy-to-use proteomic data analysis solution, please visit www.sagenresearch.com or e-mail info@SageNResearch.com.

SORCERERTM is a trademark of Sage-N Research, Inc.
SEQUEST® is registered trademark with the University of Washington
Mascot® is a registered trademark of Matrix Science Ltd

High Sensitivity Dynamic Light Scattering System

The W130i from Avid Nano is a breakthrough, high sensitivity dynamic light scattering system for size and molecular weight measurement of proteins, biomolecules and nanoparticles. 

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Critical to the W130i's outstanding performance is the integration of Avid Nano's unique SABRe - Stabilized Anti-Back Reflection optical design.  The result is an optimised measurement performance, immune to reflections and permanently mechanically stable. The patent-pending 5?l BladeCell cuvette combines the ultimate convenience of a disposable sample holder with the measurement quality of a quartz cuvette.  Built-in compatibility with standard fluorescence cuvettes and flow cells make the W130i a uniquely versatile instrument. With decades of experience in DLS design and manufacture, Avid Nano has built unrivalled reliability into the W130i.  Every component has been designed for superior performance, reliability and low maintenance operation. The W130i is also amazingly small, occupying the very minimum of valuable laboratory bench space.

Dynamic light scattering is a non-invasive technique that enables quick and accurate measurement of hydrodynamic radius, size distribution, estimated molecular weight and aggregate content of biomolecules and nanoparticles in solution or suspension.  Avid Nano DLS systems find particular utility in applications including crystal screening, buffer optimisation, solubility screening, aggregate detection, micelle formation, engineered nanoparticles and formulation development.

Operating from its UK headquarters - Avid Nano is building a strong reputation for its technical expertise, applications support and delivering DLS systems that reliably deliver top quality results.  For further information on the W130i please visit www.avidnano.com/downloads/downloads.htm or contact Avid Nano on +44-1494-614659 or email info@avidnano.com.

Wednesday, 22 June 2011

2nd International Conference on Bio-Sensing Technology 2011

Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Register by 12th August 2011 and go into a raffle for a FREE Delegate Pass or one of five tickets to the world-famous Van Gogh Museum.

Just Published: Journal of Chromatography B

A new issue of this journal has just been published. To see abstracts of the papers it contains (with links through to the full papers) click here:
Selected papers from  this issue:

Computational investigation of the substrate recognition mechanism of protein d-aspartyl (l-isoaspartyl) O-methyltransferase by docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies and application to interpret size exclusion chromatography data

21 June 2011, 21:42:29Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography B, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 21 June 2011
Ikuhiko, Noji , Akifumi, Oda , Kana, Kobayashi , Ohgi, Takahashi
Unusual amino acid residues such as l-β-aspartyl (Asp), d-α-Asp, and d-β-Asp have been detected in proteins and peptides such as α-crystallin in the lens and β-amyloid in the brain. These residues increase with age, and hence they are associated with age-related diseases. The enzyme protein d-aspartyl (l-isoaspartyl) O-methyltransferase (PIMT) can revert these residues back to the normal l-α-Asp residue. PIMT catalyzes transmethylation of S-adenosylmethionine to l-β-Asp and d-α-Asp residues in proteins and peptides. In this work, the substrate recognition mechanism of PIMT was investigated using docking and molecular dynamics simulation studies. It was shown that the hydrogen bonds of Ser60...

Application of hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction coupled with high–per -formance liquid chromatography for the study of the osthole pharmacokinetics in cerebral ischemia hypoperfusion rat plasma

21 June 2011, 21:42:29Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography B, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 21 June 2011
Jun, Zhou , Ping, Zeng , Zhao Hui, Cheng , Jing, Liu , Feng Qiao, Wang , ...
A simple and solvent-minimized sample preparation technique based on two-phase hollow fiber liquid phase microextraction has been developed and used to quantify the osthole in cerebral ischemia reperfusion rat plasma following oral administration. The analysis was performed by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Extraction conditions such as solvent identity, agitation rate, salt concentration, extraction time, and length of the hollow fiber were optimized. Under the optimized conditions, the linear range of osthole in rat plasma was 5–500ngmL−1 (r2=0.9997). The limit of detection (LOD) was 2ngmL−1 (S/N=3) with limit of quantification (LOQ) being 5ngmL−1. The validated method...

Determination of unbound ticagrelor and its active metabolite (AR-C124910XX) in human plasma by equilibrium dialysis and LC-MS/MS

21 June 2011, 21:42:29Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography B, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 21 June 2011
Henrik, Sillén , Melanie, Cook , Patty, Davis
Ticagrelor is the first direct acting reversibly binding oral platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonist. The parent molecule and the main metabolite (AR-C124910XX) are both able to block adenosine diphosphate-induced receptor signaling with similar potency. Drug binding to plasma proteins reduces free drug available for pharmacologic activity. Therefore, assessing unbound drug is important for interpretation of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic findings. This paper describes the development and validation of an equilibrium dialysis/LC-MS/MS method for measuring unbound ticagrelor and AR-C124910XX in human plasma. Plasma samples (200μl) were dialysed against phosphate buffered saline (37°C, 24h) in 96-well dialysis plates to separate unbound analytes. Drug-protein binding alterations during...

Therapeutic drug monitoring of tacrolimus by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: Is it truly a routine test?

21 June 2011, 21:42:29Go to full article
Publication year: 2011
Source: Journal of Chromatography B, In Press, Accepted Manuscript, Available online 21 June 2011
Paul J., Taylor , Michael E. Franklin Chun-Hui, Tai , Peter I., Pillans
Therapeutic drug monitoring of tacrolimus by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry has become standard practice. We report on the long-term (4.5 years) use of one such method. Whole blood samples (25μL) were treated with zinc sulphate (100μL) and acetonitrile containing ascomycin (internal standard, 250μL). A high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometer operating in positive ion mode with an electrospray interface was used. Chromatography was performed on a TDM C18 cartridge column (10×2.1mm, 10μm, Waters) using a switch gradient. A total of 4029 batches were analyzed for tacrolimus; this comprised of 81950 analyses of which 61027 were patient samples. Calibration curves (1.0–50μg/L)...

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